teiresias: (akaten)
Chantal is back in town, and while it's great to see her, my joy is tempered with sadness: she's thinking of moving to San Diego after she graduates, which will be in the spring.

It's strange that I didn't notice how limited my social life had become since I moved back-- I really don't see or talk to anyone save two or three people. I could see other people, of course, but most of them are people from high school whose company I've pretty much outgrown, and my time would really be better spent reading a good book than hanging out with them.

I do still have other good friends, but they're all dispersed across the country, and seeing them on a regular basis is problematic at best. I don't want to see people just for the sake of socializing itself, but I miss the people I genuinely care about when they aren't here. I just didn't realize how much until they came back... not enough distractions around now, I guess; sometimes, stability can be a curse. It only makes it even more important that I enjoy the time I have with my close friends while they and I are in the same place.

Nobody could seriously describe me as a social butterfly; I'm not one of those people who makes friends for friendship's own sake. If I consider someone a friend, it means they've distinguished themselves in a way few humans ever manage, and that makes that person very important to me.

So: the quest for true equilibrium continues.
teiresias: (akaten)
Chantal is back in town, and while it's great to see her, my joy is tempered with sadness: she's thinking of moving to San Diego after she graduates, which will be in the spring.

It's strange that I didn't notice how limited my social life had become since I moved back-- I really don't see or talk to anyone save two or three people. I could see other people, of course, but most of them are people from high school whose company I've pretty much outgrown, and my time would really be better spent reading a good book than hanging out with them.

I do still have other good friends, but they're all dispersed across the country, and seeing them on a regular basis is problematic at best. I don't want to see people just for the sake of socializing itself, but I miss the people I genuinely care about when they aren't here. I just didn't realize how much until they came back... not enough distractions around now, I guess; sometimes, stability can be a curse. It only makes it even more important that I enjoy the time I have with my close friends while they and I are in the same place.

Nobody could seriously describe me as a social butterfly; I'm not one of those people who makes friends for friendship's own sake. If I consider someone a friend, it means they've distinguished themselves in a way few humans ever manage, and that makes that person very important to me.

So: the quest for true equilibrium continues.
teiresias: (Default)
I traveled to Portland with [livejournal.com profile] jilocasin and his two lovely parental units, where we attended a prospective students' open house thingy for the Oregon College of Art and Craft. I, personally, was impressed with a lot of the student art we saw (which wasn't, on the whole, very much, I must admit), though my hot & sexy BF was somewhat underwhelmed by the facilities. While its mailing address says "Portland", it's actually almost in Beaverton, which makes it pretty much Suburbia, so it's not especially high on the list of options for my guy's continuing education, but it was nice to see the place and to spend time with the other half of my family, especially considering that said other half was kind enough to spring for dinner at Pazzo and then to browse with me at Powell's. All in all, a very good day, despite other-coastal distress and about 6.5 hours spent on the road.

Tomorrow, shopping for new work boots and some other things to round out my surveying ensemble, and possibly the Lovecraft play if I have time.

Peace and good health, everyone.
teiresias: (Default)
I traveled to Portland with [livejournal.com profile] jilocasin and his two lovely parental units, where we attended a prospective students' open house thingy for the Oregon College of Art and Craft. I, personally, was impressed with a lot of the student art we saw (which wasn't, on the whole, very much, I must admit), though my hot & sexy BF was somewhat underwhelmed by the facilities. While its mailing address says "Portland", it's actually almost in Beaverton, which makes it pretty much Suburbia, so it's not especially high on the list of options for my guy's continuing education, but it was nice to see the place and to spend time with the other half of my family, especially considering that said other half was kind enough to spring for dinner at Pazzo and then to browse with me at Powell's. All in all, a very good day, despite other-coastal distress and about 6.5 hours spent on the road.

Tomorrow, shopping for new work boots and some other things to round out my surveying ensemble, and possibly the Lovecraft play if I have time.

Peace and good health, everyone.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
I know that this is based entirely on one day's experience, but so far? I love my new job.

First off, it's cool purely for the chance to spend a lot of time with my uncle, who's from my dad's side of the family and thus someone I rarely see. My dad also freely admits that said uncle was and is the smartest of all six siblings, at least in terms of reasoning ability, and I believe it; I feel like I've learned more today than I have in the past four months. I now know at least the basic functions of some fairly sophisticated electronic measuring devices, as well as the names of about fifteen different kinds of rods, stakes, spikes and associated miscellanea.

Today was about evenly split between office orientation and actual fieldwork, and [livejournal.com profile] zanthraxis, I can see why you love this stuff so much, because it felt great to be both outdoors moving around and exercising my brain at the same time. Of course, today was also clear and cool with scattered clouds, so I'm well aware that when it's cold and rainy and windy I'll probably be loving the fieldwork a lot less-- to say nothing of my commute-- but I've come to the conclusion that, no matter how inclement the weather, this job beats out any data-entry slave work I could get anywhere else, which is about all that's open to me in the corporate world.

Must buy uncle really, really nice Xmas present.

Plus, my working days are totally flexible-- I'm starting off doing three days a week for now, though I was told that there's enough to be done that I could go straight to five if I so desire. I want to see about bartending school and/or that editorial internship first, though. Regardless of how I eventually divide my time, I'm being paid well enough that I should be able to move out by February/March. That is SUCH a relief, I can't even tell you. I miss the independence I had in NY like crazy.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
I know that this is based entirely on one day's experience, but so far? I love my new job.

First off, it's cool purely for the chance to spend a lot of time with my uncle, who's from my dad's side of the family and thus someone I rarely see. My dad also freely admits that said uncle was and is the smartest of all six siblings, at least in terms of reasoning ability, and I believe it; I feel like I've learned more today than I have in the past four months. I now know at least the basic functions of some fairly sophisticated electronic measuring devices, as well as the names of about fifteen different kinds of rods, stakes, spikes and associated miscellanea.

Today was about evenly split between office orientation and actual fieldwork, and [livejournal.com profile] zanthraxis, I can see why you love this stuff so much, because it felt great to be both outdoors moving around and exercising my brain at the same time. Of course, today was also clear and cool with scattered clouds, so I'm well aware that when it's cold and rainy and windy I'll probably be loving the fieldwork a lot less-- to say nothing of my commute-- but I've come to the conclusion that, no matter how inclement the weather, this job beats out any data-entry slave work I could get anywhere else, which is about all that's open to me in the corporate world.

Must buy uncle really, really nice Xmas present.

Plus, my working days are totally flexible-- I'm starting off doing three days a week for now, though I was told that there's enough to be done that I could go straight to five if I so desire. I want to see about bartending school and/or that editorial internship first, though. Regardless of how I eventually divide my time, I'm being paid well enough that I should be able to move out by February/March. That is SUCH a relief, I can't even tell you. I miss the independence I had in NY like crazy.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
So, it's about as official as it's going to get: a week from today, I'll be starting orientation at my uncle's surveying company in Bothell.

This job will, I think, be awesome for several reasons: first and foremost, the office is right on the Burke-Gilman Trail, which, for those uninitiated in the ways of Seattle, is a bike path that used to be a railroad, running through the city. I'll be able to ride my bike to work, which will save me from traffic and get me my exercise in one fell swoop. Also, I will learn how to use GPS systems and computer drafting software and all manner of neat procedures, which can only help me later in life. The company also has about 5 employees, which means I'll learn a lot of other things about running a small business, which I can also see being quite useful.

[livejournal.com profile] priorysion once said to me that he'd do just about anything to avoid the 9-to-5 daily grind, and after my recent brush with corporate America, I'm inclined to agree with him. The hours of this new job will, of course, actually be 8 to 5, but a significant portion of that will be fieldwork, actually going out and surveying sites, and to begin with, I'll only be going in three days a week.

Still not sure what I'm going to do with the remaining time-- there's an editorial internship with Seattle Magazine I'm thinking about, as well as a bartending course. I feel like bartending, besides giving flexible hours and lots of potential extra income, might afford me the opportunity to observe enough fascinating human interaction that I might actually be inspired to write fiction again. That, and I would avoid the aforementioned daily grind. I think that that, more than anything else, is the key to happiness.

Despite recent evidence, it may be that I do not, in fact, suck at life.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
So, it's about as official as it's going to get: a week from today, I'll be starting orientation at my uncle's surveying company in Bothell.

This job will, I think, be awesome for several reasons: first and foremost, the office is right on the Burke-Gilman Trail, which, for those uninitiated in the ways of Seattle, is a bike path that used to be a railroad, running through the city. I'll be able to ride my bike to work, which will save me from traffic and get me my exercise in one fell swoop. Also, I will learn how to use GPS systems and computer drafting software and all manner of neat procedures, which can only help me later in life. The company also has about 5 employees, which means I'll learn a lot of other things about running a small business, which I can also see being quite useful.

[livejournal.com profile] priorysion once said to me that he'd do just about anything to avoid the 9-to-5 daily grind, and after my recent brush with corporate America, I'm inclined to agree with him. The hours of this new job will, of course, actually be 8 to 5, but a significant portion of that will be fieldwork, actually going out and surveying sites, and to begin with, I'll only be going in three days a week.

Still not sure what I'm going to do with the remaining time-- there's an editorial internship with Seattle Magazine I'm thinking about, as well as a bartending course. I feel like bartending, besides giving flexible hours and lots of potential extra income, might afford me the opportunity to observe enough fascinating human interaction that I might actually be inspired to write fiction again. That, and I would avoid the aforementioned daily grind. I think that that, more than anything else, is the key to happiness.

Despite recent evidence, it may be that I do not, in fact, suck at life.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
My boyfriend is an awesome cook.

Perhaps I admire this quality in him more than most people would, seeing as I myself am only an indifferent (or, more accurately, uninspired) cook. Given sufficient time to become familiar with a given recipe, I can produce some truly tasty things, but I can't just look at a fridge/cupboard/whatever, take random ingredients off the shelves, and somehow compose something that manages to be delicious without ever once glancing at a cookbook. My boyfriend, however, can do this, as was demonstrated anew for me last night, and the phenomenon pleases me even as it confounds me.

To add to the happy, yesterday was also my last day at the Soul-Crushing Temple of Bitchery, also known as the Nameless for Legal Reasons Bio-Tech Company at which I've been working. The experience has taught me that I will never work in corporate America for less than $100k a year, because DAMN that place was bleak and joyless; the fact that it was in Redmond was only toxic icing on the moldy, worm-eaten cake. I met ONE genuinely nice person the entire time I was there, and everyone else was either fake or simply awful. Of course, if I had to work at that place for long, I'd be that way too, I'm sure. Must be something about the psychic fallout of making one's living off the suffering of others.

All life is an education, and I have learned something valuable from this bad experience... several things, in fact, especially when the entire past week is taken into consideration. My self-righteous arrogance, however, survives intact. It'll probably take extensive deprogramming to shake that one.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
My boyfriend is an awesome cook.

Perhaps I admire this quality in him more than most people would, seeing as I myself am only an indifferent (or, more accurately, uninspired) cook. Given sufficient time to become familiar with a given recipe, I can produce some truly tasty things, but I can't just look at a fridge/cupboard/whatever, take random ingredients off the shelves, and somehow compose something that manages to be delicious without ever once glancing at a cookbook. My boyfriend, however, can do this, as was demonstrated anew for me last night, and the phenomenon pleases me even as it confounds me.

To add to the happy, yesterday was also my last day at the Soul-Crushing Temple of Bitchery, also known as the Nameless for Legal Reasons Bio-Tech Company at which I've been working. The experience has taught me that I will never work in corporate America for less than $100k a year, because DAMN that place was bleak and joyless; the fact that it was in Redmond was only toxic icing on the moldy, worm-eaten cake. I met ONE genuinely nice person the entire time I was there, and everyone else was either fake or simply awful. Of course, if I had to work at that place for long, I'd be that way too, I'm sure. Must be something about the psychic fallout of making one's living off the suffering of others.

All life is an education, and I have learned something valuable from this bad experience... several things, in fact, especially when the entire past week is taken into consideration. My self-righteous arrogance, however, survives intact. It'll probably take extensive deprogramming to shake that one.
teiresias: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] cherrysher is back at the airport, shortly to begin her transcontinental flight back to NYC. While the weirdness of the visit (I blame Eugene! Or, like, the planets or something, because dude) strained our psyches near to the breaking point, I can't think of anyone else I'd rather have shared it with. If nothing else, the past 7 days have given me some hope that we are not destined to be forever estranged by geographical or meteorological concerns.

As far as this continent goes, I don't think I could be physically happy anywhere but in the little belt of heaven that stretches from San Francisco to Vancouver, B.C.; I find our completely non-humid summers here hard enough to bear, and after living in NY for one year straight I can't imagine willingly subjecting myself to that kind of hell ever again... except that I've realized that being apart from the important people is a different kind of hell, and, I think, a worse one.

I have a great deal of important people here, of course, and it's probably a vain hope that all of my people will ever make it to one place and stay there. I'll do whatever I can to make it happen, though.

As [livejournal.com profile] queueball said last night: "when you're fucked, you move to Seattle."

Amen.

And for my final thought... "October: The Month In Which Shit Goes Down."

I swear.
teiresias: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] cherrysher is back at the airport, shortly to begin her transcontinental flight back to NYC. While the weirdness of the visit (I blame Eugene! Or, like, the planets or something, because dude) strained our psyches near to the breaking point, I can't think of anyone else I'd rather have shared it with. If nothing else, the past 7 days have given me some hope that we are not destined to be forever estranged by geographical or meteorological concerns.

As far as this continent goes, I don't think I could be physically happy anywhere but in the little belt of heaven that stretches from San Francisco to Vancouver, B.C.; I find our completely non-humid summers here hard enough to bear, and after living in NY for one year straight I can't imagine willingly subjecting myself to that kind of hell ever again... except that I've realized that being apart from the important people is a different kind of hell, and, I think, a worse one.

I have a great deal of important people here, of course, and it's probably a vain hope that all of my people will ever make it to one place and stay there. I'll do whatever I can to make it happen, though.

As [livejournal.com profile] queueball said last night: "when you're fucked, you move to Seattle."

Amen.

And for my final thought... "October: The Month In Which Shit Goes Down."

I swear.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
Landing of the good starship [livejournal.com profile] cherrysher: t-minus three days.

I just realized that this coming weekend will mark my first trip to Oregon since high school. That, I must say, is far too long-- I dearly love the state, despite (or, really, because of) its manifest crazinesses. Though really, being from Washington as I am, I'm hardly one to tar others with the crazy brush. For example, it's much easier to get by in Portland without a car than it is in Seattle.

The surfeit of fast, reliable public transport is one of the only purely material things I miss about the East Coast, lemme tell ya.

The plan, as I currently understand it, is to take the Greyhound down to Portland on Friday, and thence to get a ride to Eugene. ([livejournal.com profile] cherrysher, I'll call you tomorrow if you don't call me first? Oh, and bring something Goth-y to wear. :))

It's an adventure like in days of old for a while, and then, god willing, I'll have some deathly-dull temp job to replenish my sadly anemic bank account. It's not the ideal way to earn one's bread, of course, but it rarely happens that people in my stage in life can do much better, at least without some trade-specific education, which I of course don't have, having chosen pure learning over practicality.

And frustrating as my current situation is, not being given the chance to prove what I know I can do, I don't regret that choice. I have the rest of my life to look for jobs, but that opportunity only really comes once in a lifetime. And, of course, most people live and die without ever knowing the joy with which I've already, at this early date, been blessed. I don't think I remember that as often as I should. Though my ego insists that I should have everything out right! NOW! I don't, but that's okay. I still don't necessarily like it, but then I am nothing if not a superlative narcissist.

So, it's off to another interview tomorrow, then a concert and then, my non-homosexual life partner arriveth. Life, really, is pretty damn good.

Be well, all.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
Landing of the good starship [livejournal.com profile] cherrysher: t-minus three days.

I just realized that this coming weekend will mark my first trip to Oregon since high school. That, I must say, is far too long-- I dearly love the state, despite (or, really, because of) its manifest crazinesses. Though really, being from Washington as I am, I'm hardly one to tar others with the crazy brush. For example, it's much easier to get by in Portland without a car than it is in Seattle.

The surfeit of fast, reliable public transport is one of the only purely material things I miss about the East Coast, lemme tell ya.

The plan, as I currently understand it, is to take the Greyhound down to Portland on Friday, and thence to get a ride to Eugene. ([livejournal.com profile] cherrysher, I'll call you tomorrow if you don't call me first? Oh, and bring something Goth-y to wear. :))

It's an adventure like in days of old for a while, and then, god willing, I'll have some deathly-dull temp job to replenish my sadly anemic bank account. It's not the ideal way to earn one's bread, of course, but it rarely happens that people in my stage in life can do much better, at least without some trade-specific education, which I of course don't have, having chosen pure learning over practicality.

And frustrating as my current situation is, not being given the chance to prove what I know I can do, I don't regret that choice. I have the rest of my life to look for jobs, but that opportunity only really comes once in a lifetime. And, of course, most people live and die without ever knowing the joy with which I've already, at this early date, been blessed. I don't think I remember that as often as I should. Though my ego insists that I should have everything out right! NOW! I don't, but that's okay. I still don't necessarily like it, but then I am nothing if not a superlative narcissist.

So, it's off to another interview tomorrow, then a concert and then, my non-homosexual life partner arriveth. Life, really, is pretty damn good.

Be well, all.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
And his form suffered not in his absence.

I desperately hope that his reading of Roberts isn't too optimistic, but then, I don't set nearly as much store by an Ivy League pedigree as most people seem to-- I'm a snob, but I also know how easy it is to get into those schools if one knows the right people. That's not to say, of course, that there aren't a great many wonderful and amazing students and teachers at those institutions, but the same is just as true of other places that don't get nearly as much hoopla.

Still, I have to hope that being exposed to such a rarefied intellectual atmosphere has had a more beneficial effect on Roberts than it seems to have had on our current president.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
And his form suffered not in his absence.

I desperately hope that his reading of Roberts isn't too optimistic, but then, I don't set nearly as much store by an Ivy League pedigree as most people seem to-- I'm a snob, but I also know how easy it is to get into those schools if one knows the right people. That's not to say, of course, that there aren't a great many wonderful and amazing students and teachers at those institutions, but the same is just as true of other places that don't get nearly as much hoopla.

Still, I have to hope that being exposed to such a rarefied intellectual atmosphere has had a more beneficial effect on Roberts than it seems to have had on our current president.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
In re: my last post, [livejournal.com profile] jilocasin managed magically to make me feel better, as he always does, and while I'm still unemployed, I suppose I can see how that's better than having a job I almost certainly would have hated. After all, nothing that comes out of Bellevue can be of the good.

So, I've started another round of emailing, and to use some personal contacts this time, which I was hoping to not have to do. It was a bit important to me to feel as though I'd done something myself, that I'd gotten a job based solely on the merits of my résumé and nothing else... that, however, has fallen by the wayside. Personal contacts make the world go 'round, so let's just hope they manage to make my world revolve a little faster, because it's been almost two months now and I'd like to have some progress to show for it, if that's all right.

In other news, I've been invited by the Cult of Personality himself to Fadó on Monday to hear his band The Senate play and, one devoutly hopes, have some fun, because I need some. Any of you who will be in the area and free at the time, and might be interested in going, do let me know-- it starts at 10 PM, though I'd be quite amenable to doing something beforehand as well.
teiresias: (from <lj user="swankyfunk">)
In re: my last post, [livejournal.com profile] jilocasin managed magically to make me feel better, as he always does, and while I'm still unemployed, I suppose I can see how that's better than having a job I almost certainly would have hated. After all, nothing that comes out of Bellevue can be of the good.

So, I've started another round of emailing, and to use some personal contacts this time, which I was hoping to not have to do. It was a bit important to me to feel as though I'd done something myself, that I'd gotten a job based solely on the merits of my résumé and nothing else... that, however, has fallen by the wayside. Personal contacts make the world go 'round, so let's just hope they manage to make my world revolve a little faster, because it's been almost two months now and I'd like to have some progress to show for it, if that's all right.

In other news, I've been invited by the Cult of Personality himself to Fadó on Monday to hear his band The Senate play and, one devoutly hopes, have some fun, because I need some. Any of you who will be in the area and free at the time, and might be interested in going, do let me know-- it starts at 10 PM, though I'd be quite amenable to doing something beforehand as well.
teiresias: (akaten)
Tomorrow, the 'rents go off to Victoria for their anniversary, leaving me the house for a few days. It's funny-- back in high school, I would've been jumping for joy at the prospect of that, but now, having the place empty of family just makes me feel like even more of a guest, a transient. I love my family, a lot, but being back here in my childhood room after years away is just... disheartening. I feel like I'm moving inexorably backward, settling slowly into some despair-laden pit of slackerdom.

All is not lost, though. I have my Italian interview tomorrow, which should go well, especially considering all the brush-up translating I've been doing, and even though working in Bellevue seems like nothing so much as death, the job itself sounds somewhat interesting, and if they pay me enough, I'll do just about anything.

Other potential jobs are on the horizon, as well; therefore, independence is not out of reach.  I'd just like some idea of what the next phase of it all is going to be.
teiresias: (akaten)
Tomorrow, the 'rents go off to Victoria for their anniversary, leaving me the house for a few days. It's funny-- back in high school, I would've been jumping for joy at the prospect of that, but now, having the place empty of family just makes me feel like even more of a guest, a transient. I love my family, a lot, but being back here in my childhood room after years away is just... disheartening. I feel like I'm moving inexorably backward, settling slowly into some despair-laden pit of slackerdom.

All is not lost, though. I have my Italian interview tomorrow, which should go well, especially considering all the brush-up translating I've been doing, and even though working in Bellevue seems like nothing so much as death, the job itself sounds somewhat interesting, and if they pay me enough, I'll do just about anything.

Other potential jobs are on the horizon, as well; therefore, independence is not out of reach.  I'd just like some idea of what the next phase of it all is going to be.

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